Agenda Item 1.23 Passes Committee, Moves to Plenary.

On the afternoon of Tuesday, February 7 (Geneva time), Committee 4 of the 2012 World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12) approved Option 1 to satisfy Agenda Item 1.23, with minor editorial amendments to the text received from Working Group 4C. Option 1 calls for a worldwide secondary allocation to the Amateur Service at 472-479 kHz, with a power limit of 1 W EIRP, with a provision for administrations to permit up to 5 W EIRP for stations located more than 800 km from certain countries that wish to protect their aeronautical radionavigation service (non-directional beacons) from any possible interference. Option 2 was NOC (no change to the current rules).

In keeping with the rules of the Conference, Committee decisions must be read twice in Plenary session; the decision of the Conference is not final until after second reading in Plenary. According to ARRL Chief Executive Officer David Sumner, K1ZZ, quite a few additional administrations — mainly in the former Soviet Union and Arab states — will be adding their country names to the Footnotes prior to consideration in Plenary.

Iran proposed that the 800 km distance be changed to 2000 km, and have this cited in a Footnote, but there was no support. Both CEPT and CITEL, along with the Netherlands, opposed this change. Colin Thomas, G3PSM, is the CEPT spokesman and ARRL Technical Relations Specialist Jonathan Siverling, WB3ERA, is the spokesman for CITEL.

Footnotes offer an administration (a country) to “opt out” of the decision of a WRC, creating an exception to the table of frequencies in the Radio Regulations. For example, a country may say that it will not use a certain service in a portion of the spectrum that has been designated for that service by the WRC. Therefore, a footnote is created in the Radio Regulations for that portion of the spectrum, indicating a designated use is not available in that country, even though it may be available in many other parts of the world.

“Another issue we have been following closely is the introduction of allocations for HF oceanographic radars, which is Agenda Item 1.15,” Sumner said. “It is now clear that there will be no impact on amateur allocations, including the 5 MHz channels we are allowed to use in the US”.

Agenda Item 1.15 deals with oceanographic radar. “One of the candidate bands for the placement of oceanographic radar is 5.250-5.275 MHz,” explained IARU Secretary Rod Stafford, W6ROD. “There have been a number of administrations that have granted amateurs access to spectrum around 5 MHz. In fact,one of the bands listed by IARU as a spectrum requirement for a future allocation is 5 MHz. If oceanographic radar is operating in the 5.250-5.275 MHz band, that may impact the ability of the amateurs to obtain an allocation in that area”.

One of the responsibilities of each WRC is to set the agenda for the next Conference; WRC-12 delegates will therefore set the agenda for WRC-15. “Proposals for agenda items for WRC-15 are still in a state of flux,” Sumner explained, “so there is as yet nothing concrete to report. The agenda item for an amateur allocation around 5300 kHz is still alive, but a positive outcome is by no means certain”.

VIA the ARRL Web site.

7095 LSB in use for earthquake in Philippines

7095 LSB in use for earthquake in Philippines
2012-02-07

I received a mesage this morning from a shortwave listener in Taiwan that 7095 KHz ssb is in use for emergency communications in the Philippines after the earthquake that happened Monday. Thanks to Keith Perron for this message.

Vernon Ikeda – VE2MBS/VE2QQ

Pointe-Claire, Québec
Rédacteur du blogue de RAC/rédacteur des nouvelles en ligne/bulletins de nouvelles web de RAC

 

4.8 Mw – VANCOUVER ISLAND, CANADA REGION

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 4.8 Mw
Date-Time
  • 4 Feb 2012 20:08:57 UTC
  • 4 Feb 2012 12:08:57 near epicenter
  • 4 Feb 2012 12:08:57 standard time in your timezone
Location 48.919N 127.618W
Depth 13 km
Distances
  • 196 km (122 miles) S (183 degrees) of Port Hardy, BC, Canada
  • 210 km (130 miles) SW (236 degrees) of Campbell River, British Columbia, Canada
  • 229 km (142 miles) WNW (287 degrees) of Neah Bay, WA
  • 314 km (195 miles) W (280 degrees) of Saanich, British Columbia, Canada
  • 329 km (204 miles) W (265 degrees) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 18.8 km; Vertical 7.3 km
Parameters Nph = 51; Dmin = 93.5 km; Rmss = 1.45 seconds; Gp = 144°
M-type = Mw; Version = 7
Event ID US b0007x1g

For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://neic.usgs.gov/

5.7 Mw – VANCOUVER ISLAND, CANADA REGION

— NO TSUNAMI WARNING —

5.7 Mw – VANCOUVER ISLAND, CANADA REGION
Preliminary Earthquake ReportMagnitude 5.7 Mw
Date-Time 4 Feb 2012 20:05:32 UTC
4 Feb 2012 12:05:32 near epicenter
4 Feb 2012 12:05:32 standard time in your timezone
Location 48.867N 127.875W
Depth 12 km
Distances 204 km (127 miles) S (188 degrees) of Port Hardy, BC, Canada
228 km (142 miles) WSW (238 degrees) of Campbell River, British Columbia, Canada
246 km (153 miles) WNW (284 degrees) of Neah Bay, WA
332 km (206 miles) W (279 degrees) of Saanich, British Columbia, Canada
349 km (217 miles) W (264 degrees) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 14.7 km; Vertical 7.8 km
Parameters Nph = 423; Dmin = 171.4 km; Rmss = 1.20 seconds; Gp = 72°
M-type = Mw; Version = 8
Event ID US b0007vx6
For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

Special WRC Report Number Two

[IARU-R2-News 160] Special WRC Report Number Two
2012-02-03

The procedures used by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) before and during a World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC) seem complicated. They are somewhat complicated but they are understandable with a bit of background.

Each agenda item that will be decided at a WRC has been studied for at least 3 or 4 years leading up to a WRC. ITU Working Parties discuss the issues involved in the agenda item. Compatibility studies, sharing studies, experiments, etc. take place whenever needed so that discussions and decisions can be made based upon facts rather than opinions. Within a year prior to the start of a WRC an important meeting called the Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM) occurs. The CPM report pulls together all of the information dealing with each of the agenda items and sets forth the various ways, if there is more than one, that an agenda item can be satisfied or decided. By the time of the CPM, most all of the arguments in favor of the agenda item and opposed to the agenda items have been thoroughly discussed in the many meetings that take place regarding each agenda item. When a national administration arrives at the WRC, decisions have generally been made by that administration whether to be in favor or opposed to any particular agenda items. However, it is usually not that clear cut. Some administrations may be in favor if certain adjustments or modifications are made to one or more of the proposed methods to satisfy the agenda item. In other words, discussions and negotiations really get started during the earlier stages of the WRC. For example, Administration X may withhold support or opposition on a specific proposal until other administrations agree to support Administration X.s position on other agenda items that Administration X is very interested in.

At the beginning of the WRC, each agenda item is assigned to a Sub-Working Group (SWG) to allow interested administrations and other interested attendees the opportunity to discuss the agenda item. This is the stage where most of the negotiations and compromises are made in order to arrive at a consensus as to how to decide the agenda item. The preferred way is to have a consensus by the SWG attendees. Many times the consensus is achieved by all parties realizing that the result may very well turn out to be a situation where “everyone is a little bit unhappy”.

The flow of the work is that the output of the SWG goes to the Working Group level. After the WG (WG)level deals with the issue it moves to the Committee level. By the time the issue gets to the Committee level, revisions to the work done at the lower levels is generally not done. Once the agenda item passes the Committee level, it goes to the Plenary for two readings. If it passes the two readings the agenda item appears in the Final Acts of the WRC.

There are also times when a consensus by ALL parties is just not possible. An agenda item can move from the SWG stage to the Working Group stage where most administrations have reached a consensus on how to resolve the issue but there are still some administrations that are in favor of No Change (NOC).

Agenda Item 1.23. In the case of agenda item 1.23, there was a good deal of support among administrations at the SWG level for a secondary allocation to amateur radio just below 500 kHz. However, there was strong resistance by several administrations to the allocation based upon a stated concern that amateur operation in that portion of the spectrum could cause interference to Non-Directional Beacons. SWG 4C3 (the SWG dealing with agenda item 1.23) met 12 times over a period of ten days trying to arrive at a consensus on 1.23. Finally, a consensus was achieved on the issue by adding various footnotes dealing with the allocation that satisfied most of the administrations opposing the allocation. At the end of the day, there were still a couple of administrations opposing the allocation. As a result, the SWG elevated the issue to the Working Group level with 2 options to satisfy the agenda item:

1) a secondary allocation to the amateur service in the band 472-479 kHz with certain operating conditions set forth in footnotes to the allocation, or

2.) No Change (in other words, no amateur allocation).

The proposal that has been agreed to by most administrations that support the amateur allocation calls for a worldwide secondary allocation to the amateur service at 472 to 479 kHz with a power limit of 1 watt e.i.r.p., but with a provision for administrations to permit up to 5 watts e.i.r.p. for stations located more than 800 km from certain countries that wish to protect their aeronautical radionavigation service (non-directional beacons) from any possible interference. Proposed footnotes provide administrations with opportunities to opt out of the amateur allocation and/or to upgrade their aeronautical radionavigation service to primary if they wish to do so. In addition to these protections for aeronautical radionavigation, the amateur service must avoid harmful interference to the primary maritime mobile service.

At the Working Group meeting, there was no shifting of positions so the matter was elevated to the next level to Committee 4 with the same 2 options. The Committee 4 meeting takes place on Tuesday, 7 February. I will report on the results of that Committee 4 meeting but based upon the results thus far, I am cautiously optimistic that the amateurs will have a new secondary allocation at 472-479 kHz.

Agenda Item 1.15. Another agenda item being carefully watched by the IARU is agenda item 1.15 dealing with oceanographic radar. One of the candidate bands for the placement of oceanographic radar is 5.250 to 5.275 MHz. There have been a number of administrations that have granted amateurs access to spectrum around 5 MHz. In fact, one of the bands listed by IARU as a future allocation is 5 MHz. If oceanographic radar is operating in the 5.250-5.275 MHz band, that may impact the ability of the amateurs to obtain an allocation in that area. The candidate bands have not been finalized as yet at the WRC.

Rod Stafford W6ROD
IARU Secretary – Region 2

Earthquake – 6.9 Mw – VANUATU

6.9 Mw – VANUATU

Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 6.9 Mw
Date-Time
  • 2 Feb 2012 13:34:38 UTC
  • 3 Feb 2012 00:34:38 near epicenter
  • 2 Feb 2012 05:34:38 standard time in your timezone
Location 17.810S 167.149E
Depth 10 km
Distances
  • 122 km (76 miles) W (267 degrees) of PORT-VILA, Vanuatu
  • 253 km (157 miles) S (180 degrees) of Santo (Luganville), Vanuatu
  • 294 km (183 miles) NW (310 degrees) of Isangel, Vanuatu
  • 1805 km (1122 miles) NE (56 degrees) of Brisbane, Australia
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 15.0 km; Vertical 2.8 km
Parameters Nph = 114; Dmin = 477.6 km; Rmss = 0.90 seconds; Gp = 32°
M-type = Mw; Version = 7
Event ID US b0007uiv

For updates, maps, and technical information, see:
Event Page
or
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
http://neic.usgs.gov/

BC YUKON SECTION BULLETIN 2012-01

 

BC YUKON SECTION BULLETIN 2012-01

Ron McFayden, assistant Section Manager for the Yukon,

has advised that Terry Maher, VY1AK, has accepted the

position of Section Emergency Coordinator-Yukon.

Terry has been active with the Yukon Emergency Measures

Organization for some time and is also an active member

of the Yukon Amateur Radio Association.

Paul Giffin
Section Manager British Columbia Yukon
Radio Amateurs of Canada.